Investing in Community: The Sangudo Opportunity Development Co-op

Tucked into a bend in the Pembina River lies Sangudo, Alberta — an unassuming town of roughly 300 residents.  With a small population and Edmonton nearby, building economic strength — or even maintaining it — is tough. Not ones to sit idly by, people in this tightly knit community took matters into their own hands and are busy revitalizing the town.

Leading the charge is Carol and Dan Ohler, two long-time Sangudoites. Full of vitality, warmth and optimism, the Ohlers are a positive influence in this quiet, prairie town. We toured Sangudo with Dan, and it was not hard to see why these two community leaders have been so busy. The town is beautiful. Trees and shrubs line quiet streets, while the slow-moving Pembina runs alongside, and gentle hills add texture to the surrounding prairie environment. Small, local businesses line main street and a peaceful, steady pace carries the people working, living and playing there.

The Ohlers welcomed us into their home for coffee and some amazing rhubarb muffins Located on a beautiful acreage, a short drive from Sangudo, the place doubles as a couples retreat and the Ohlers host counselling sessions there as well. While there, we learned more about an innovative initiative the couple helped found: an investment co-op.

As founding members of Sangudo Opportunity Co-op, Carol and Dan told us more about this unique local investment opportunity they helped create. 

The SODC formed in 2009 to stimulate business and investment opportunities in the community. Local people wanted to invest their money in local businesses and the co-op was the way to do it, by accepting money from investors and distributing it to businesses that apply for it. A few years after it was created, the co-operative has helped build two businesses, and a home. 

Dan is a compassionate leader who cares a great deal about his town. He was kind enough to lead us on a tour of SODC’s accomplishments. As he led us around, he talked about the importance, not just of developing businesses in the community, but what those businesses bring along with them — a sense of pride and vibrancy, and a reason for people, young and old, to stay in Sangudo .

“We’re not just building businesses,” he said, “we’re building community.”

Our first stop was Sangudo Custom Meat Packers, the first business to get started with the help of the SODC. This meat processing shop’s owner was looking to retire and the community was interested in keeping it around. Two young guys were interested in running the business, but raising the capital to purchase the building was going to be a problem.

So in came SODC, which raised $250,000 in just 9 minutes from local cattle producers and other community members who recognized the value in having a butcher close by. During the tour I noticed they employ almost entirely young people — a deliberate step with revitalization in mind , and one that inspires trust and loyalty in young residents who want to build lives in Sangudo. The business is probably doing so well today in part because of that.

Of course, I had to try some of the local products for sale. I decided on some bacon & cheddar smokies and a package of beef jerky — the  jerky came in this large slab of teriyaki goodness and the smokies came packed full of cheese and bacon that turned out to be a great combo to eat on their own or in a bun. I took the smokies with me on a camping trip the next weekend and I recommend roasting them over a campfire. 

Before we checked out the second SODC-backed business we stopped by the new home the co-op invested in. Situated on a hill, the house is in a great location with a large yard and is very well finished. The investment in new housing is designed to spruce up the hamlet with new developments and inspire residents to take pride in their homes. It’s also a symbol of optimism for the community and putting a young family in the home will cement that sentiment.

The SODC-house is built on a hill with a spacious plot.

For lunch we went to one of two restaurants on Sangudo’s Main Street — the Cookhouse on Main. The restaurant was first taken over by a local entrepreneur after the SODC bought the Legion Hall. In recent years, Sangudo had seen a number of Main Street buildings close their doors, and  the SODC decided the hall would not share this fate. Leasing the building out (which later transitions to a mortgage — brilliant!), to a young entrepreneur helps keep doors open and business going in this gorgeous rural community.

The end result is a spacious restaurant that’s been put to good use as a meeting space for businesses, sports wind-ups, and of course the local coffee row. Jill Dewdney, who runs the Cookhouse, also told me this space has brought in new events to Sangudo , like concerts, fitness classes, and more. Events like this help attract new faces and outside investment.

The Cookhouse on Main serves many functions in the community, including being used as one of the only event spaces in Sangudo.

It’s easy to see that Dan is always thinking ahead and planning the next development for the town he so obviously loves. He explained his vision for Main Street and the role  he thinks the co-operative should play in achieving it:

While the SODC is helping these businesses by leasing and mortgaging properties, that’s not all they’re doing. They are, as Dan said, building community.

For Sangudo Custom Meat Packers this means an emphasis on hiring young people. The Cookhouse builds community by providing a meeting place. It all makes for a shining example of what small town life can be: a place where everyone has a chance to thrive and to connect with each other.

As we said our goodbyes Tanner and I reflected on our short but jam-packed time in the community. At the top of the list was the hospitality we encountered. The people in this town are amazing. (Great food is also a theme you might have picked up on!) A few of the interviews we did were a little last-minute and yet people welcomed us (and fed us) all the same. 

If I were to sum up the experience, I would say Sangudo is full of people that care deeply for one another and their beautiful town. Thank you to everyone we spoke to and a special thank you to the ever-energetic Ohlers for showing us the community you call home.